2 thoughts on “Kelty Redwing 50-Liter Backpack, Black, Small/Medium

  1. unsatisfied
    201 of 207 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Some Redwing 50 Med/Large questions answered!, June 15, 2014
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kelty Redwing 50 Backpack (Sports)
    I recently bought this bag and wanted to come on here to answer some of the questions i had and could not find the answers to before the purchase so here they are.
    The hip straps ARE removable.
    There are NO holes in the metal zipper to lock them aside from using the strings attached.
    The metal spine IS removable.
    There is also a hard plastic backing to this that IS also removable, however if you take the metal spine out as i did this is very handy to still have in as it keeps the packs structure.
    CONTRARY to what Kelty say, The Regular rain cover will fit a fully loaded Med/Large pack completely, almost perfectly. (however if you intend to attach more things to the outside of the pack it will not fit.
    You can finesse the straps so that they don’t stick out and dangle so much as well if you plan to be throwing this on a lot of trains and planes.

    All that said, i purchased this pack for a backpacking trip through some countries and had read that it was only a 2-3 day pack. Well, i don’t know what people are putting into their packs for 3 days but i fit a solid weeks worth of clothing in here with extra socks, tanks, and undies taboot! not to mention all the other amenities you would take ( thin raincoat, pack raincover, camera, power converters, cologne, locks, toothpaste.etc.) and i still had some room to spare for a souvenir or shirt to bring back.

    I wrote this ‘book’ in hopes of alleviating the concerns of anyone else who is thinking of buying this pack but like me wanted more info before spending the money!! Its a great – and roomy- pack!

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  2. Candid Reviewer
    52 of 53 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Pack perfection — an excellent choice for hiking, bushcraft, AND travel with moderate (35lbs.) loads, December 6, 2014
    By 
    Candid Reviewer (GA USA) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Kelty Redwing 50 Backpack (Sports)

    The Kelty Redwing 50-Liter Backpack fully deserves its status as one of the most popular packs ever made. With its durable 420D Polyester Ball Shadow body fabric and 450D Polyester Oxford reinforcements, its brilliantly convenient design, its acceptably light 53 oz. weight, and its ability to carry medium-weight loads (around 35 pounds) comfortably, this is an outstanding value that compares favorably against packs that cost two or three times as much. For those who want to lighten the load further, you can remove the plastic backsheet and aluminum stay, dropping the pack’s weight to an impressive 43 oz. (1,222 grams, or 2.7 lbs.). Use a rolled up sleeping pad (I use the Thermarest RidgeRest Solar) to surround your gear ‘burrito-style’ in the main body and you’ll still have outstanding frame-like support that carries so well you won’t even notice the stay and backsheet are missing.

    Here are the features I love…

    NO HASSLE COMPRESSION STRAPS
    One of the most obvious and desirable features of this pack is its lack of the dozens of pieces of webbing that dangle off so many other packs. There are two compression straps on each side of the pack, but the lower straps run behind/through the side pockets to keep the webbing tails out of the way, and the upper straps wrap over the tops of the side pouches. Assuming you know how to pack intelligently, this offers enough adjustability to snug up the pack to stabilize a load, but without the mess of strap ends that plague so many other packs (which usually have to be trimmed or taped up to make them manageable).

    GREAT ACCESSIBILITY
    I prefer top-loading packs, but every once in awhile, you may need something from the bottom of your pack. In those cases, panel loading packs are usually more convenient. Kelty’s brilliant solution is to let this pack work both ways. If you keep the top compression straps clipped in place, the zippers that open the top lid stop when they reach the straps. But if you unbuckle those straps, the zippers can keep traveling all the way down the front of the pack, effectively opening the entire front panel for full access to the deepest corners of the main compartment, if desired.

    UBER-CONVENIENT DESIGN/LAYOUT
    I like simple packs with few compartments, partly because too many organizer inserts would add unnecessary weight, and partly because the added complexity of a bunch of organizer pockets can actually make it harder to remember where you put your gear. The Kelty strikes the absolute perfect balance. Its main compartment is large and free of any organizers except a single hydration bladder pocket (which is perfectly sized for a 3L Platypus hydration bladder, and has a pair of nylon clips to hold the bladder up, especially when there is no gear in the pack to help support it). There is also a hydration tube port (opening) in the top, center of the main compartment to pass a hydration tube out to the front of the pack instead of having to run it out between the zippers of the top lid.

    On the outside of the pack, there is a zippered compartment in the top lid, a roomy cylindrical side pocket on each side, and a large zippered stash pocket with organizers on the face/back. In the top lid, I keep a pair of work gloves, a few trail bars/snacks, a compass, and trail maps, with a little room to spare that usually gets stuffed with additional snacks.

    The side pockets are tall and narrow–perfect for tall/long items like a large fixed-blade knife, a short hatchet, a cylindrical water filter such as the MSR Waterworks, long tent stakes, and other such items. I use them for quick-access items that I like to have at the ready. One has my fire kit, Mora Companion HD knife, Bahco Laplander saw, and Sawyer Mini water filter with its backflush syringe, all packed in a selnder nylon pouch that I use as a make-shift, lightweight shoulder bag to carry these items around camp or on dayhikes when I want to leave my pack behind. The other side pocket has a small roll of toilet paper and hand sanitizer in a ziploc bag, a rolled up 1.5L Evernew flexible bladder for filtering dirty water through my Sawyer Mini, and some bundles of various lengths of paracord for rigging my tarp/tent and other miscellaneous cordage needs. There is room to spare in both pockets, so I usually stow a few trail bars or some other snack/food item here as well.

    The front stash pouch is large enough to hold a compressible jacket like (my favorite) the Marmot Driclime Windshirt, but it also has a few organizer pockets where I keep a small headlamp, a Swiss Army Small Tinker knife (for whittling and for tweezing out splinters), a basic medical kit in an Altoids tin, a small roll of medical gauze/wrap, a couple of energy bars, my car keys, and other little items I don’t want to have to search for in the main compartment. There is also a clip and tether where you can attach a set of keys, but I use it to…

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